All Fallout 4 Power Armor

Checking Out of Your Game

You’ve finally finished! All the quests you wanted to do are done. All of the items you wanted to get have been obtained…so now what? Do you just leave? Turn off the game and move on just like that? What if you’re not done? What if you want to come back and play again? You have to be ready for that right? Future-you won’t know where you left off or where everything is. No, it’s not enough to just leave and move on. Preparations must be made!

I noticed something peculiar when I finally finished Fallout 4 over the holiday season. Even though I was happy to have finished the game and ready to move on, I found myself being drawn back to it. I couldn’t really tell why at first, it was just a weird feeling of having unfinished business. While I did indeed have some unfinished business it was the sort that wasn’t really possible to finish (never was able to find that right leg). The feeling remained nonetheless though. I found my head filled with the questions above, and I concluded that I just wouldn’t be able to move on until I’d left the game in a state that I could just hop back into at some point in the future. So instead of immediately moving on, I set about getting ready for my eventual return (even though I had no real intention at the time).

At first it was just about making things accessible. I completely revamped my storage system and poured everything into my workshop at Sanctury Hills. I gathered all of my power armor in one place. I sold or broke down all of the weapons, armor, and items I didn’t need. “Okay, that should be enough right?”, I thought. Well, it turns out the answer was “NOPE!”. My mainstay weapons had to be completely upgraded. That Power Armor needed to be fully customized, painted, and given a dedicated space. That space needed to be turned into a workshop/living quarters to make sense. Sanctuary Hills needed to have tougher defenses to ward off raiders. That bobble-head stand in the corner needed ALL the bobble-heads before it could be displayed properly! Finally, that Power Armor space needed its own defenses, giant copper lions, and a fountain! I even went so far as to assign all the Sanctuary settlers to beds and tasks, something I had no intention of doing at all before this! However, at long last the it was ready. Everything was in its proper place, was upgraded, accessible, and spiffed up. It’s too bad I won’t be making use of it anytime soon.

The funny thing is that this isn’t the first time I’ve felt the need to leave a game in a certain state before leaving it. I had to have my house a certain way in Skyrim before moving on, and I had to have my fortress set a certain way before leaving Dragon Age: Inquisition. The stupid thing in all this? I don’t think I’ve returned to play any of those files yet! Yet that’s how it has to be. If there’s even a chance I might come back and play a file for dlc or something, I always have to leave it a certain way before moving onto another game. Hopefully Fallout won’t follow the pattern of the others and end up remaining unplayed indefinitely. 😀


Do you have any end-game habits? Anything you find yourself doing over and over in similar games even if it doesn’t do all that much to impact your experience?

(image captured by Hatm0nster)

7 thoughts on “Checking Out of Your Game”

  1. I usually don’t like to leave a game until I’ve finished everything. I recently beat DK64, and after I beat the final boss, I couldn’t stop until I revisited some previous levels and collected the remaining bananas I had missed. In Banjo-Tooie, I couldn’t leave until I redid my favorite challenges a few times.

    I felt really incomplete when I stopped playing Ni no Kuni, but my characters simply weren’t strong enough to complete the final few challenges. And I wasn’t in the mood for leveling up. I might return later and try making my characters stronger again. I won’t be satisfied until I know I’ve given it my best efforts.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It really stinks when you get down to the end of the game and the only way to complete your unfinished business is having to do a lot more grinding or waiting first.

      In Fallout 4, power armor respawns in the game world after about a month of in-game time has passed. If I had waited around long enough, I might have had a chance at the missing armor piece I was looking for, but only a chance. Maybe I’ll try to get it again once I feel like committing time to Fallout again.

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  2. I wish I had some end-game habits — they might encourage me to revisit games more often! Once I’m done with a game, whether it’s completed or not, I just leave it in state. Rarely do I go back to complete lingering challenges or quests. If I do return to a game at some point in the future, I’ll usually just start up a new game anyway, rather than return to a previous save.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There’s something to be said for that kind of approach too. I’ll bet it’s easier to consider your game “done”, and move on, yeah? I’d actually like to be able to do more of that.

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  3. I usually don’t leave a game until I’ve completed all of it. I tend to get hung up on games for a while too. Playing it over and over again. I also have to have a fresh start when I play a game. I can’t create a save and return to it later. My mommy brain will have me questioning what the heck I was doing before the save. I have a really bad habit of deleting all of my saves.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I don’t usually go for getting everything in a game. I just want to get it to a point where it feels done and I can hop in some time later and look at the results, even if I never intend to invest any more time into that save file.

      That said, I can relate to needing a fresh start with an incomplete file. It technically took me 5 years to finish FFVII because I got into a pattern of starting the game and playing to the 1/3 or half-way point, leaving it sit for several months, and then coming back and forgetting what was going on. Ah well, just gotta start over right?

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